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LOOK FOR: Morels, Closely Guarded Secret of the Forest PDF Print E-mail
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Washington, DC: Elizabeth Hargrave and Matt Cohen authors of The Natural Capital blog. Matt also provides wild edible classes through Matt's Habitats.

We first learned about morels about ten years ago, when someone told us that she had a spot where she went to pick them -- but she wouldn't tell us where it was. We soon learned that morels are delicious mushrooms that come up year after year in the same place. And the location of each patch is a secret as closely guarded as if there were pure gold sprouting up on the forest floor.

 

Morel


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LOOK FOR: Chicken of the Woods PDF Print E-mail
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Washington, DC: Elizabeth Hargrave and Matt Cohen authors of The Natural Capital blog. Matt also provides wild edible classes through Matt's Habitats.

Chicken of the woods is a great mushroom with a great name. The fungus forms overlapping orange fans that look a little like the tail feathers of a chicken. And if you cook it and eat it (only after careful ID, please!) you may find the texture a lot like chicken, too.

 

 

 


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LOOK FOR: Chanterelles PDF Print E-mail
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Washington, DC: Elizabeth Hargrave and Matt Cohen authors of The Natural Capital blog. Matt also provides wild edible classes through Matt's Habitats.

Chanterelles are a choice culinary mushroom prized by chefs around the world. And they grow in Washington, DC [and the Mid-Atlantic region].

The most common chanterelle species in our area, Cantharellus cibarius, generally comes up in July; we've already found several this year. They are golden yellow to yellow-orange (but not pumpkin orange). The gills on the underside of the cap are very distinctive because they continue down the stem, and are not very deep -- it's almost like the mushroom has wrinkles, rather than the gills you'd see on a typical gilled mushroom. The smell is also distinctive -- sweet and fruity, like apricots (some guidebooks also suggest rose and pumpkin).

 


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Hard Cider: Homemade hooch is cheap and easy PDF Print E-mail
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Michelle Gienow. Once upon a time, apple cider--both sweet and "hard" fermented (alcoholic) cider--was early America's favorite beverage. Cider was simple to produce, and in a time before municipal sewage treatment and indoor plumbing, it was often safer to drink than water. These days cider's more of an autumnal novelty drink, but I recently became obsessed with making my own. I was looking for a good supply of local, organic, and affordable fruit juice to get my family through the winter, and since oranges don't grow in Maryland, apple cider seemed the natural answer.

 

 


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Seeking a Healthy Primitive Community PDF Print E-mail
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This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . How Trading, Ecology, and Economics Affect Health, Wealth and Happiness

The words Ecology and Economics have the same root. The Greek word oikos means house. In any house, economy or ecosystem, the flow of energy in and out is crucial to whether or not the house is thriving and healthy. The economy of a nation or region is stagnant when not enough goods, services and money change hands. The significant process in a healthy system is FLOW: receiving and dispensing over and over. Hoarding does not help the whole. Such stagnation affects the members of a community, region or nation, and even the world.


Read more: Seeking a Healthy Primitive Community
 
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